Transcript

lang-zh-Latn
Hi, I'm Fame Ketover of Lenguin.com and this is Mandarin Chinese. 1, 2 - Chicken Moo Shu 3, 4 - Hunan Pork 5, 6 - You have chopsticks?
This is our first look at numbers. We'll start of easy, with only the numbers 1 through 6.
Alright, let's see what that might sound like.
  • èr
  • sān
  • liù

Again, slightly faster.
  • èr
  • sān
  • liù
We're going to learn the numbers in pairs.
Listen to the speaker count to 2.
  • èr

Listen to the difference in tones.
  • èr
One has the high tone, it seems to hang in the air. Two has the falling tone, it sounds emphatic.
Try repeating after the speaker.
  • èr
In future lessons we'll see how the word for "one" changes in combination with other words. But for right now, "one" is always in the high tone. It has an initial Y but most speakers don't pronounce it.
Repeat after the speaker.
Now "two". Repeat after the speaker.
  • èr
  • èr

The tongue curls back strongly for the final R sound. Repeat.
  • èr
  • èr
Try counting to 2 ahead of the speaker, number by number.
  • èr

Again.
  • èr
It may help you remember the pronunciations of the first two numbers and even the high tone - falling tone pattern if you imagine yourself spelling the end of the word "number", E R.
Try counting to 2 again.
  • èr
  • èr

Now try counting backwards from 2 keeping the correct tones.
  • èr
  • èr
Listen to the speaker count to 4.
  • èr
  • sān

Again, paying attention to the tones.
  • èr
  • sān

Now repeat after the speaker number by number as she counts to 4. Notice that
  • "sān"

has the high tone and
  • "sì"

has the falling tone.
  • èr
  • sān
What is 3?
  • sān
  • sān
Count to 4 again after the speaker.
  • èr
  • sān
Good. Try counting to 4 ahead of the speaker number by number.
  • èr
  • sān

What are the two odd numbers?
  • sān

Notice that both have the high tone. What are the two even numbers?
  • èr

Notice that both have the falling tone. Try counting to 4 alone remembering that the tones alternate.
  • èr
  • sān

Again.
  • èr
  • sān

Now try counting backwards from 4 alone.
  • sān
  • èr

Again.
  • sān
  • èr
Now listen to the speaker count to 6.
  • èr
  • sān
  • liù

Repeat after the speaker, number by number.
  • èr
  • sān
  • liù
Count to 6 after the speaker again.
  • èr
  • sān
  • liù
What's 6?
  • liù
  • liù
5 has the low tone. Be sure to take it down as low as you can go. 6 has the falling tone, the same as "2" and "4".
Try saying "5, 6" and repeat after the speaker.
  • liù
  • liù
Notice that the Pinyin for "5" ("wǔ") begins with W. This W may be weak or silent like the Y in "yī".
Repeat after the speaker.
The Pinyin for 6 ("liù") is one of those abbreviated forms we looked at in the last lesson. There really should be an O between the I and the U to make it clear that the vowel part of the syllable is pronounced as "yo yo yo wassup".
Try repeating that much of the syllable after the speaker.
  • yòu
  • yòu
The problem is in putting this "yòu" after consonants which we never do in English. One way to sneak upon it is to say "Leo" as in Leo the Lion, then shift the stress over onto the O, leO, and then speed it up and say it as one syllable with only a trace of the E sound, "liù".
Like this:
  • lī òu
  • līòu
  • liù

Your turn.
Now try repeating after the speaker.
  • liù
  • liù
Try counting to six ahead of the speaker, number by number.
  • èr
  • sān
  • liù

Try counting to 6 alone and repeat.
  • èr
  • sān
  • liù

Try giving the odd numbers we've had so far and repeat.
  • sān

Try giving the even numbers and repeat.
  • èr
  • liù
Notice that 2, 4, 6 all have the same tone. This give a sort of rhythm to the first three pairs of numbers.
Try counting to 6 and then repeat paying attention to the tone pattern.
  • èr
  • sān
  • liù
  • èr
  • sān
  • liù

Now try counting backwards from 6 number by number ahead of the speaker.
  • liù
  • sān
  • èr

Now count to 6 forwards again and repeat one last time.
  • èr
  • sān
  • liù
Awesome. That's the end of this lesson. Remember to head over to Lenguin.com to do the exercises. That's Lenguin as in Lenguin the Penguin. Thanks for watching! I want to thank all of our supporters for their help in making these courses possible. We want to keep these courses free, and with your help we can do that. So be sure to head over to our Patreon page, where in exchange for as little as a dollar, you'll get BONUS stuff. Until next time, stay cool.
Login
I forgot my password
I forgot my password

Request a password reset. Enter your username and you'll get a mail with instructions:

Back to Login Page
Register
Back to Login Page